How to Make Halifax Buses Twice as Fast

Halifax, NS, was ranked 20th in Transit this year in Canada by Moneysense magazine. These guys from PLANifax think that there are a number of reasons but, it’s because transit is slow.

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GEOGRAPHY IN BUSINESS? – GIS for Business and Service Planning

GEOGRAPHY AS THE BASIS OF GIS 

In the rush to create bigger and better technical solutions, many in the GIS industry tend to forget that the discipline known as “geography” is the basis of GIS. GIS provides nothing more than the opportunity to manipulate and analyse geographical phenomena using automated systems. In fact, Michael Goodchild, director of the US National Center for Geographic Information Analysis (NCGIA) quite “recently” suggested (Goodchild 1992) that the acronym GIS should be understood to stand for “geographic information science”. This new definition would place more emphasis on analysis of “geographic information” and less on “system”.

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Implementing Spatial Analysis and GIS Applications for Business and Service Planning

 

Over the past few years there has been a remarkable increase in interest is GIS. Many of the earliest users were in universities, government departments and environmental agencies. Activity in these traditional core areas is now being supplemented by vigorous growth in several emerging markets, the most important one being business and service planning. For many of these new users, the GIS focus to date has been basic mapping and asset management. Other, more advanced, users are modelling data held in integrated databases. This modelling activity is frequently referred to as spatial analysis.

 

WHAT IS SPATIAL ANALYSIS?

“Spatial analysis” is one of those terms that are so widely used in so many different contexts that it is difficult to define succinctly. Good child (1988, p; 68) offers a good general definition of spatial analysis as “that set of analytical methods which require access both to the attributes of the objects under study and to their locational information”. Openshaw (1991b, p. 18) suggests that what geographers refer to as “spatial statistics”. Anselin (1989) and Goodchild et. Al (1992) prefer to use the term “spatial data analysis” although there seems to be no substantial difference. Continue reading Implementing Spatial Analysis and GIS Applications for Business and Service Planning

GIS For Dummies – Generating Non-Cartographic Output

Maps are the traditional output from GIS, but not everyone is well-versed in reading maps. The ultimate goal of GIS is to communicate results. GIS has many ways to communicate results that are not purely cartographic. Check out a few of these methods so that you’re ready to deliver your GIS output to meet the needs of diverse audiences.

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GIS For Dummies – Working with networks

Networks are collections of connected linear objects such as roads, railroads, or rivers that branch from place to place. They come in different sizes, numbers of branchings, and angular configurations.

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GIS FOR SMART TRANSPORTATION

Move, track, deliver, plan, manage and deploy. Today, getting products and people from point A to point B takes more than planning a route and watching traffic reports. We want it fast, reliable and cost effective. We want smart transportation. Continue reading GIS FOR SMART TRANSPORTATION

GIS, FINALLY, FOR BUSINESS

With GIS we understand what HAPPENED, what IS HAPPENING and what WILL HAPPEN in the geographic space. A picture is worth a thousand words, and this short ESRI animation, in spite of having no locution, reviews, in a very didactic way, what GIS stands for, its uses and, finally, how GIS can be used for business administration, my main interest and, probably, yours too. Continue reading GIS, FINALLY, FOR BUSINESS